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Posts from the ‘Will Planning’ Category

18
Feb

Why have a will when you have beneficiaries?

You give up some control when you just have beneficiaries and no will

by Ed Olkovich for MoneySense magazine

Q: I am married. I have RRIF and LIRA and my spouse has RRSPs. We have joint cashable accounts too. We have appointed each other as beneficiaries for every account. I am told this arrangement takes longer to settle on death if there is no will. Why do I still need a will?

—Krish

Click to read the answer to this question on the MoneySense website.

14
Sep

Preparing your Heirs for Wealth

If you think your heirs are not quite old enough or prepared enough to discuss the wealth they will inherit on your death, you’re not alone. Unfortunately though, this way of thinking can leave your beneficiaries in a decision-making vacuum: an unnecessary predicament which can be avoided by facing your own mortality and making a plan.

If you have a will in place, great. A will, however, is only a fundamental first step, not a comprehensive plan, point out authors of the 2017 Wealth Transfer Report from RBC Wealth Management.

“One generation’s success at building wealth does not ensure the next generation’s ability to manage wealth responsibly, or provide effective stewardship for the future,” they write. “Knowing the value (alone) does little to prepare inheritors for managing the considerable responsibilities of wealth.” Overall, the report’s authors say the number of inheritors who’ve been prepared hovers at just one in three. Read more

14
May

The Duties of an Executor

An executor is an individual or institution that is named in a will whose duty is to distribute estate assets according to the testator’s wishes. Acting as an executor can be stressful and time consuming so it is a good idea for a testator to make his or her choice wisely, and for someone who is asked to be an executor to investigate and review exactly what the job entails.  Often the executor is the spouse of the deceased. That tends to make the role somewhat more straightforward than it would be for a family member, friend or other acquaintance. In any event, this article covers the duties and obligations of an executor.

Arranging the funeral 

In addition to arranging the burial or cremation and funeral services according to the deceased’s wishes the executor would be responsible in ensuring that family, friends and interested parties (especially employer) have been notified about the death.  Family members will most likely assist in this including the posting of the obituary. If there are sufficient funds in the bank account of the deceased the bank will usually release  funds to cover the cost of the funeral. Read more »

21
Mar

Should You Become Executor of Someone’s Estate?

By Carla Hindman, Director of Financial Education, Visa Canada

One of the most important decisions you’ll make when writing your will is determining who should be named executor of your estate. Even if you’re just leaving behind household goods and a small savings account, someone – whether appointed by you or the government – must settle your affairs.

Some people consider it an honour – or duty – to take responsibility for ensuring that their loved one’s final wishes are carried out. But serving as an executor can be onerous and time-consuming, even for those with a strong financial or legal background. In a worst-case scenario, executors who act imprudently or in violation of their duties can be sued by beneficiaries and creditors. Read more »