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Posts from the ‘Retirement Planning’ Category

13
Apr

Supporting adult children takes its toll on boomers’ retirement plans: survey

As baby boomers approach retirement while their children look for financial help, many are feeling the financial strain.

A new TD survey found 62 per cent of boomers can’t save enough for retirement because they’re supporting adult children or grandchildren. Those kids, however, aren’t taking that money obliviously: 44 per cent of millennials who rely on their parents’ or grandparents’ support said they know that help means fewer retirement savings, and 43 per cent said they’d cut costs rather than asking for financial help.

Read: Canadians postpone retirement to support children

“As a parent or grandparent it’s natural to want to help our kids and grandkids who may be facing financial challenges such as finding full-time employment or paying their day-to-day expenses,” Rowena Chan, senior vice-president at TD Wealth Financial Planning, said in a news release. “It’s important that this desire to help is balanced with the goals you have when it comes to retirement.” Read more »

13
Mar

Why an advisor makes a difference in net returns over DIY investors

It’s a common question in recent times, especially in an age when technology and algorithms can make decisions at a fraction of the cost. Is it worth it to hire a financial advisor? Or is it better to save the fees and go for a DIY strategy?

It depends who you ask but there are many – often not so obvious – factors that could make a difference to your net returns when putting your trust in a financial advisor.

Proper financial planning goes beyond how and where you invest. Good financial planning can increase your standard of living throughout your life.

Even for a complete novice it is possible to start investing in products without the help of professionals. The problem with this option is the lack of knowledge. Knowledge is crucial when it comes to investing. Read more »

15
Feb

Five Financial Products You Should Own

By Brenda Spiering

1. Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)

As soon as you begin your working life, you should have a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP). It’s one of the most tax-effective ways to save for retirement.

You’re allowed to contribute up to 18% of your earned income from the previous year to a maximum of $25,370 for 2016 and $26,010 for 2017. (If you’re a member of a group pension plan, your contribution room is reduced by your “pension adjustment,” an amount you’ll find listed on your T4.)

Contributions are tax deductible, meaning you can net a tidy tax refund while building your savings. Plus, you can turbo-charge your RRSP savings by putting that tax refund back into your RRSP as soon as you receive your cheque. Read more »

15
Dec

Start saving early

by Caroline Hanna

You’re never too young to make smart financial decisions. Whether you entered your 20s with a solid savings portfolio funded by your parents, saved up some of your own money, or spent it all on education, here are four tips on how to get ahead financially.

01 Start now

A lot of 20-somethings feel they’ve missed the savings boat. You haven’t. You may have missed out on high interest rates, but the principles of savings apply, even when rates are low.

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