Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Disability Income Replacement’ Category

14
May

Workers unprepared for financial impact of disabilities

Most Canadian workers would suffer severe financial hardship if they were forced out of work with a disability.

In fact, 76% believe that should they become disabled and unable to work for three months, there would be serious financial implications for their family, such as significant debt or an impact on retirement plans, finds an RBC Insurance survey.

Despite the concern, only 27% have discussed how a disability would financially impact their family. This number does not increase substantially among workers who’ve indicated that they’ve taken time off in the past because of a disability (33%).

Read more

 

Used with permission from Benefits Canada Magazine
©iStockphoto.com
15
Feb

Five Financial Products You Should Own

By Brenda Spiering

1. Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)

As soon as you begin your working life, you should have a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP). It’s one of the most tax-effective ways to save for retirement.

You’re allowed to contribute up to 18% of your earned income from the previous year to a maximum of $25,370 for 2016 and $26,010 for 2017. (If you’re a member of a group pension plan, your contribution room is reduced by your “pension adjustment,” an amount you’ll find listed on your T4.)

Contributions are tax deductible, meaning you can net a tidy tax refund while building your savings. Plus, you can turbo-charge your RRSP savings by putting that tax refund back into your RRSP as soon as you receive your cheque. Read more »

15
Feb

Protecting Your Family

Let’s face it, raising a family today can be financially challenging.  The cost of living continues to increase, housing costs are rising along with education and extra-curricular activities for our children.  It is tough to make ends meet and still have something left over at the end of each month.

Most families today require both parents to work to afford the lifestyle they enjoy.  Losing one of those incomes through premature death, illness or a disability is a real risk that many families would have a difficult time facing emotionally and financially.

How do you protect your family? Read more »

16
May

1 in 3 Canadians Will Become Disabled Before the Age of 65

What you need to know about your Group Long Term Disability
Having a source to replace your earned income in the event of an illness or accident is vital considering that on average, 1 in 3 Canadians will become disabled for a period of more than 90 days at least once before the age of 65.  For those that are disabled for more than 90 days the average length of that disability is 2.9 years.

If you are one of the approximately 10 million Canadians covered under a group Long Term Disability plan (LTD) it’s important to understand what your coverage provides. Don’t wait until after you’re disabled to read the employee handbook, because you could have a few surprises!

Read more »